How Much Does It Cost to Change Your College Major?

College is a time for exploring your options and discovering your passion. Sometimes, though, pursuing that passion might mean that you have to change majors. This isn’t uncommon; about three out of four college students change their major at some point during their educations. However, before you take the leap to another major, be sure to consider the consequences of doing so.

The Cost of Changing Course

Thoroughly examine the course requirements of the major you’re considering switching to. How many extra semesters will you have to spend in school to fulfill those requirements? Each of those additional credits comes with a price tag. Some colleges even have an “excess hours credit rule,” which means they charge more for courses that will keep you in school significantly longer than students who never change their major. Talk to your counselor about the new major you want to take on, and be sure you understand any added fees that come with switching. The more often you switch your major, the more likely you are to hurt your bank account. You also have to consider not just the cost of the classes themselves, but also the extra money you’ll have to spend on class materials such as textbooks.

The Best Time to Switch Majors

Simply put, if you’re going to change your major, you should do it as soon as possible. According to CollegeTransfer.net, “If you are within your first 60 credits, you have a better chance of moving your credits and course work around to other majors or programs of study than if you are already taking major or upper level courses you no longer have interest in nor may the credits be applicable when you change your major.” If you are beyond the first 60 credits of your degree, compare your current courses with the requirements for your new major. The more overlap there is, the cheaper the switch will be.

How to Mitigate the Costs of Switching

If you decide that switching majors is the right option for you, be careful how you go about it. If your current school does not offer the required courses for your new major, you will have to spend extra time and money on applying to other schools and going through the hassle of transferring your credits. It is best to stick with your current school. You can also investigate scholarship opportunities within your new major. Some scholarships are specifically geared toward certain career tracks. Also, since each change to your major results in extra expenses, perform thorough research about the major you want to switch to. Interview other people who have the same major or who entered a career after completing that major. Learn all you can so your next major switch is your last one.

Changing majors is a big decision, and it isn’t a cheap one. Before you commit to a new major, carefully consider the financial consequences as well as your personal feelings. You don’t want to have any regrets about your decision.

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